Life Sciences – Biomedical Engineering, B.S.
Curriculum

Discovery Core

Foundations Credits:
FCWR 101 Writing I: Foundations of College Composition 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: WRIT 100 or Writing Placement Exam

A course introducing students to the fundamentals of college composition. Topics include writing process, rhetorical strategies, basics of critical reading and thinking, analytical writing, and argumentative writing. This course serves as a foundation to prepare students to succeed in other academic writing contexts. Coursework includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 151 Writing II: Foundations of Research Writing 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: FCWR 101 or WRIT 101

Further development of the academic writing, critical thinking, and analytical reading skills taught in Writing I. An introduction to academic discourse in the four core seminar areas: literature, social sciences, behavioral sciences, and philosophy. Development of library skills leading to a documented research paper.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 304 Communication for Technical Professions 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Building on courses taken in their majors, students will learn and apply concepts of effective written and oral expression appropriate for careers in the technology professions, such as engineering and computer science. In addition to modes of technical discourse (definition, description, analysis, interpretation), this course emphasizes strategies for effective business communication in the technical professions and stylistics of technical communication. Methods and procedures of research are explored in depth. Course work includes a computer lab component, oral presentation of final reports using presentation software, and exploration of appropriate technology for technical communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSC 101 Foundations of Scientific Process 3
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the big ideas of different scientific disciplines, and is grounded in the scientific process. The course focuses on interdisciplinary aspects, the scientific process, and it is writing intensive, interactive and relevant.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSP 105 Foundations of Speech Communication 3
Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCIQ 101 Foundations of Inquiry 3
This course introduces you to the fundamentals of critical thinking. Topics include an overview of the research methods in various academic disciplines, reasoning, constructing an argument, and evaluating information. This course serves as a foundation for your continued development of critical thinking skills in other core classes, your major program coursework, and your personal and professional life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 18 Credits
 
Seminars Credits:
ICLT 3XX Literature choice 3
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ICPH 3XX Philosophy choice 3
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ICSS 3XX Social Science choice 3
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ICBS 3XX Behavioral Science choice 3
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    Total: 12 Credits
 
Math and Science Credits:
MATH 170 Calculus I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155 or Math Placement Exam

Study of lines and circles. Functions, limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, introduction to derivatives of trigonometric functions. Application of derivatives to physics problems, related rates, maximum-minimum word problems and curve sketching. Introduction to indefinite integrals. The conic sections.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
PHYS 170 General Physics I 4
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 170

A basic course covering vectors, Newton's laws of motion, particle kinematics and dynamics, work, energy, momentum, and rotational motion.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-2-4
    Total: 8 Credits
 

Major Requirements

Biology Credits:
BIOL 110 General Biology I 4
The similarity in living things is demonstrated by a molecular and cellular approach to biology. After introductory biochemistry, the cell as the basic unit of life is studied structurally and metabolically. Life functions are examined from a cellular and from a vertebrate-organismic viewpoint. The central theme is the flow of energy between the biosphere and the ecosphere. The scientific method and hypothesis-testing are stressed as a means of investigation and forming conclusions. Collaborative laboratory assignments will include microscopic studies of the cell, its functions, and the dissection of a fetal pig.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 150 General Biology II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 110

The variety of living things is demonstrated by a study of representative plants and animals, emphasizing the viewpoints of taxonomy, phylogeny, morphology, and physiology. The continuity of life is demonstrated through studies in reproduction, genetics, and organic evolution. Scientific inquiry and critical thinking strategies are emphasized. Collaborative laboratory assignments include the dissection and study of fixed and living specimens representing the whole range of life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 340 Biochemistry** 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and CHEM 210. Life Sciences Osteopathy majors: Prerequisite BIOL 150 and co-requisite CHEM 210.

A practical introduction to the fundamentals of the structure and properties of the biomolecules in close context with their metabolism. Major emphasis is placed on the dynamic nature of biochemistry and the interrelationships of the various metabolic pathways that make up the totality of life. Work in the laboratory illustrates the more common biochemistry techniques and principles encountered in the lecture.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 12 Credits
** Prerequisites waived with department approval.
 
Anatomy (choose one) Credits:
BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy 4
A structural study of the human body. Topics include cells and tissue, skeleton, articulation, muscles, body systems, special organs, and surface anatomy.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 220 Comparative Anatomy 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 150

The structure, development, and evolution of vertebrates are studied. Laboratory work emphasizes the development of structure in vertebrates, using dissection specimens including the shark, cat, and monkey.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 4 Credits
 
Physiology (choose one) Credits:
BIOL 310 Human Physiology 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 210 and one course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110. Life Sciences Osteopathy: One course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110.

An introductory course in the functions and mechanisms of the human body. Laboratory exercises include the detection and measurement of these functions using modern methods.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 311 Comparative Animal Physiology 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 220

This course provides students with an understanding of how mammalian animals adapt physiologically to environmental challenges and addresses the basic physical and chemical principles that underlie physiological processes. A variety of biological systems are discussed, including respiratory, circulatory, digestive and metabolic, osmoregulatory, thermoregulatory, renal, nervous, musculoskeletal, neural, hormonal, and sensory. Weekly laboratory sessions will match the lectures, and provide hands- on experience in wet and dry labs. (i.e., observation, data collection, measurements, writing reports and problem-solving skills). The course prepares students for advanced topics in physiology and other heath related fields.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 4 Credits
 
Genetics (choose one) Credits:
BIOL 233 Genetics* 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: BIOL 150, CHEM 150

A study of the fundamental theories, methods, and application of genetics. Mendelian genetics, the foundation for the discipline, will be discussed as well as recent advances, including recombinant DNA research and cloning. Operational or modern genetics will be compared to traditional theories. Other topics will include: the operon, microbial genetics, the triplet code, complementation analysis, extra chromosomal inheritance, and population genetics.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 431 Cell Biology 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 340

Biochemical and biophysical aspects of cellular structures and functions are covered. Laboratory exercises demonstrate the fundamental life processes at cellular level.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 4 Credits
* BIOL 335 Genetics also counts towards this requirement.
 
Chemistry and Physics Requirement Credits:
CHEM 110 General Chemistry I 4
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 135 or TMAT 135, MATH 136 or TMAT 155, MATH 141, MATH 161, or MATH 170

An introduction to theoretical and inorganic chemistry. Studies include: types of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, gas laws, and chemical calculations. Laboratory work illustrates common laboratory techniques as well as chemical principles.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 150 General Chemistry II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 110

A continuation of CHEM 110. Topics to be covered include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, ionic equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions, and electrochemistry. Laboratory work illustrates the principles discussed in the lecture.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 150

This course includes the study of the stereochemistry and electronic structure of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, and the properties of their functional groups. Laboratory work consists of the determination of physical constants and the preparation of various organic compounds.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
PHYS 180 General Physics II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PHYS 170.

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 180. Students in BS Electrical and Computer Engineering and BS Mechanical Engineering must earn a grade of C or better in PHYS 170.

A continuation of PHYS 170. Topics include fluids, wave motion, electric fields and electric potential, DC circuits, magnetic fields, capacitance and inductance, AC circuits, and electromagnetic waves.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-2-4
PHYS 225 Introduction to Modern Physics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PHYS 180

This course is designed to familiarize students with the following topics: thermodynamics, optics, relativity, atomic and nuclear physics, fundamental quantum theory of photons, and semiconductors.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 19 Credits
 
Chemistry and Physics Elective (choose one) Credits:
BIOL 315 Neuroscience 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 310 or BIOL 311

The student will acquire a basic understanding of the anatomy of the nervous system and its functioning. Histology of nervous tissue, major divisions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and embryological development are introduced. The topographic and intimal anatomy of the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, brainstem, midbrain, diencephalon and forebrain, are then discussed. Functional aspects are emphasized and examples of common clinical problems are given. A systems approach is also used to introduce the special senses, including vision, audition, olfaction, and the general systems of sensation and motor functioning. The hypothalamus, the autonomic nervous system and the limbic areas are also presented. Neuroscience and clinical subjects are also emphasized, as well as higher cognitive functioning, reflex activity and circadian rhythms.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CHEM 410 Physical Chemistry 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 310 and Co- requisite : MATH 170

A study of the fundamental principles of modern physical chemistry. Topics include: the kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics, thermochemistry, properties of solutions, and chemical kinetics. Laboratory work is designed to illustrate the fundamental laws and basic physicochemical methods.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-4
PHYS 365 Biomedical Physics* 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: PHYS 225, CHEM 150 and BIOL 150

The goal of this course is to illustrate the applications of physics concepts, principles, and modeling techniques to the solutions of fundamental problems in biology and medicine, as encountered in Biomedical Engineering. The course will investigate a broad spectrum of topics, including: Biomechanics, Bioelectricity, Bio-fluids, Bio-Optics, Thermodynamics of living systems, Atomic and Nuclear Physics, Waves and Sound, and Nanotechnology . Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3–4 Credits
* BIOL 365 may be substituted.
 
Computer Science/Mechanical Engineering Credits:
CSCI 155 Computer Organization and Architecture 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CSCI 125, EENG 125 or CSCI 135 and MATH 161 or MATH 170

This course introduces students to the organization and architecture of modern computers. The students will learn a variety of concepts from the stored-program concept and the machine cycle, to the representation of code and data. The basic components of a computer and their functionality are analyzed including processor data path, pipelines, I/O devices, memory hierarchy, and interconnection networks. The instruction set architecture and its importance in reducing the gap between hardware and software is also discussed. Students will also learn how to evaluate computer performance.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CSCI 125 Computer Programming I 3
This course provides basic skills in problem solving and object-oriented programming using a high level language such as Java or C++. Topics include algorithm development, simple data types, expressions and statements, program flow control structures, objects, methods and arrays. Knowledge of Algebra

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-1-3
—OR—
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MENG 201 Engineering Programming 3
This course provides an introduction to computer programming and develops skills in problem solving, algorithm development, and programming using software such as MATLAB. Topics include data types and storage, expressions and statements, program flow control, arrays, and functions. Matrix and vector operations are also introduced.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-1-3
    Total: 6 Credits
 
Electrical Engineering Requirement Credits:
ETCS 105 Career Discovery 2
The course experience provides the skills and tools necessary for a technical career while enabling students to develop confidence in their academic endeavors. The creative role in the multi-disciplinary design and development process is emphasized in addition to communication skills, ethical, legal, and professional responsibilities. This course will also introduce students to campus resources, effective time management skills, study skills, financial literacy, and career planning. This course may be waived for students with sophomore or higher status.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-0-2
EENG 125 Fundamentals of Digital Logic 3
The course introduces students to the modeling and design of fundamental digital circuits. Topics cover introduction to binary numbering, Boolean algebra, combinatorial and sequential logic circuits and memory elements (e.g. ROM, RAM and non-volatile computer memory). VHDL will be used in modeling, simulation and synthesis of digital circuits. Knowledge of Algebra.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EENG 211 Electrical Circuits I** 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 170 and PHYS 170.

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 180 and PHYS 180.

Properties of linear networks, mesh and nodal analysis, network theorems, solution of first order and second order circuits in the time domain are studied.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
—OR—
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
EENG 212 Electrical Circuits and Engineering Tools 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 180 and PHYS 180.

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 260

Properties of linear networks, mesh and nodal analysis, network theorems, solution of first order and second order circuits in the time domain are studied. A software package, such as PSPICE, MATLAB and MATHCAD will be introduced.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-1-4
EENG 270 Electronics I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EENG 211 or EENG 212

Characterization of semiconductor diodes, Zener diodes, transistors and field effect transistors (FET).Effect of temperature variation. Amplifier bias analysis and large signal analysis. Power amplifiers. Small signal models and small signal amplifier analysis.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EENG 275 Electronics Lab I 1
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (EENG 211 or EENG 212 or EENG 221) and Group 2 (FCWR 101 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111 or FCWR 111)

Laboratory work to complement lecture courses.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 0-3-1
EENG 371 Microprocessors 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: CSCI 155

This course presents an overview of embedded systems design and applications. Special emphasis will be given to constraints which are unique to an embedded setting, such as memory, power, and form factor constraints. Topics covered include embedded systems; machine language execution; assembly and high level language programming; analog/digital conversion and input/output interfacing; debugging; and interrupts. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EENG 489 Senior Design Project I 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EENG 320, EENG 330 and EENG 371

This course, part of a two course sequence, provides students with the design principles and tools necessary for project formulation, literature search and mathematical modeling techniques, the use of simulation software, project management, and proposal writing skills. Students will work in multidisciplinary teams to prepare proposals to design a system or component of a system. Project proposals will draw significantly on knowledge and skills acquired in previous coursework, in areas such as digital control, microcomputers, CLSI,, etc. and will incorporate engineering standards, design specifications and realistic constraints.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-3-2
EENG 491 Senior Design Project II** 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EENG 401 and EENG 489

This is a course open to seniors which provides the major design experience as required by ABET. Students will work in multidisciplinary teams to design a system or component of a system. This will be a comprehensive design that draws primarily on skills and knowledge acquired in previous coursework. The teams will work on an independent basis with the primary function of the instructor being that of a mentor to the students. The design will incorporate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints such as its impact on society, health and safety, environmental considerations, sustainability, political, social and ethical considerations, literature and patent search, and project management. Weekly progress reports as well as a final oral and written presentation will be required.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-3-2
    Total: 19–20 Credits
** Prerequisites waived with department approval.
 
Electrical Engineering Elective (choose one) Credits:
EENG 419 Medical Devices** 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EENG 310 Corequisite: EENG 371

The fundamentals of embedded systems design and implementation are introduced. The fundamentals include: specifications of microcontrollers, common hardware/software, performance analysis and optimization, CAD tools, hardware-description languages, FPGA design flows, and Low-power computing. This course will provide students with an overview of the latest advancements in research, design, development, and new applications of a wide variety of medical devices. A brief background on excitable cells, and neuromuscular system will be provided; hence, no biological background is needed. Examples of important medical devices, including pacemakers, cochlear implants, insulin pumps, and deep brain stimulators will be discussed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EENG XXX Engineering Elective 3
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Science Elective 3
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    Total: 3 Credits
** Prerequisites waived with department approval.
 
Industrial Engineering (choose one) Credits:
IENG 245 Statistical Design I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 161 or MATH 170 or TMAT 235

Fundamentals of engineering probability and statistical analysis as applied to industrial problems: sample spaces, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling techniques and design of statistical investigations, Bayesian decision making. Emphasis is on the application of these ideas to the decision-making process, rather than pure theory.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 150

An introduction to the principles and calculations of quantitative analysis. Topics include: chemical stoichiometry, acid and base concepts, ionic equilibria, acid-base titrations, spectrophotometry, oxidation-reduction reactions, complex compounds, gravimetric analysis, and precipitation titrations .Laboratory work consists of elementary gravimetric, volumetric, and instrumental analysis.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-5-4
MATH 235 Applied Statistics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 150 or MATH 151 or MATH 170

An introduction to modern inferential statistics with appropriate applications to telecommunications and related fields. Major topics covered are descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling and the Central Limit Theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. The primary focus in this course will be on application of these statistical ideas and methods. Students will be required to conduct individual statistical projects involving the collection, organization and analysis of data.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3–4 Credits
 
Mathematics Credits:
MATH 180 Calculus II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 170. Students in BS Electrical and Computer Engineering and BS Mechanical Engineering must earn a grade of C or better in MATH 170.

Riemann sums, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of the calculus. Area, volumes of solids of revolution, arc length, work. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Inverse trigonometric functions. Formal integration techniques. L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals. Polar coordinates.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
MATH 260 Calculus III 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 180

Sequences and series, Taylor series. Vector analysis and analytic geometry in three dimensions. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, total differential, the chain rule, directional derivatives and gradients. Multiple integrals and applications.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
MATH 320 Differential Equations 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 260

Solving first order ordinary differential equations: exact, separable, and linear. Application to rates and mechanics. Theory of higher order linear differential equations. Method of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters. Application to vibrating mass and electric circuits. Power series solutions: ordinary and singular points, the method of Frobenius. Partial differential equations: the method of separation of variables.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 11 Credits
 
General Elective Credits:
Consult with advisor on elective choices. 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
 
Total Required Credits = 129–132